Saturday, December 28, 2013

Cab Curtains | 22 Comments - Click Here :

       I was gonna wait and post about the locomotive I've been working on once it was finished. It just needs a few more details and weathering before I can call it completed. But I'm pretty pleased with how well the cab curtains turned out, and felt I should share it!
    One thing that really bugs me about most imported brass models, is that the cab doors are usually modeled closed. To help hide this, I followed an article by Chad M. Zentz in Model Railroad Hobbyist Magazine, in which he used tea bags to represent canvas cab curtains. Here is the link to the article: http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/magazine/mrh-2011-11-nov/teabag-cab-curtains .
   I also used the tea bag material for the cab shades. I finished my curtains and shades with a lite wash of Soviet Green and India ink. I'm sure I will think of other uses for this material.
   For you tea lovers; I even drank the tea while I was making these! They are a great little detail to add, and the engine crew will appreciate them come winter in the Rocky Mountains.



22 Comments - Click Here :
  1. Hey Mister Leedy, I put up some Otto Perry shots in your thread over at the discussion.
    I hate to nit-pick but the top roll is way too far forward to be of any use in the way of protection. It needs to be more at the back of the cab roof overhang.

    Chris
    in New Zealand

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    1. Critical feedback is gladly accepted Chris; otherwise I wouldn't post a blog for the world to see. Thanks for pointing out those photos. I clearly missed how the curtain goes around the back of the cab. The locomotive is not finished yet, so this will be an easy fix. I’m gonna go make some more tea! (-:

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    2. Darel, I had to get in before that "other guy" did, hehe!
      I noticed that there appears to be on loco's in later years no long curtain on the Enginedrivers side like the D&RG had. DPL photo by Otto Perry illustrates this best DPL call # OP-6271

      Chris
      in New Zealand

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    3. I appreciate the close-ups and additional information Chris. Thanks!

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    4. Mr. Leedy, if you look at Chris's carefully enlarged images, you will see the rear curtain did not extend the full length of the rear of the cab roof. It stops short allowing the engineers cab door to open as has been proposed by Earl Knoob and others.

      I also have observed a guard that spans the coal bin--what purpose does this serve? Does it keep the rear curtain on the tender side?

      And last, were the curtains removed seasonally? I am modeling the spring of 1939, and have but one locomotive with a plow; I wonder if I should model some curtains on that loco alone?

      Darel, you mention you have multiple models--are you going to model 72 and 73 also?

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    5. Ooops, forgot to sign that one.

      Keith Hayes
      Leadville in Sn3

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    6. Keith, Yes, I may have jumped the gun on the way I modeled the curtains. All of the pictures that have been referenced however are from the late 30's. Where as I am modeling circa 1920. I need to do some more research of pictures from my era before I do any re-modification to the existing curtain. I may just leave them as is and not worry about it. I could swear I've seen pictures of the curtain on the engineer's side.

      You may be correct about the guard. I don't see allot of snow in the pictures. I think just rolling them up and out of the way would have sufficed year round.

      I have two 71's, one of which will become 73.

      I'm looking forward to your next operating session!

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  2. Looking nice, Mr. Leedy. Now you need the ubiquitous flue cleaner on the fireman's side, and a wood coal gate thrown up on top of the coal pile and you will be good to go!

    Keith Hayes
    Leadville in Sn3

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    1. Thanks Keith!
      It needs the toolbox on the back wall of the cab too. A glaring miss by OMI.

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  3. Yeah! Good job Darel! I'll have to check out the article link. IIRC some of the OMI models did include the locker on the back of the cab.

    I think I see a firebox light in one of your photos. I'm looking forward to more details on what all you did to this engine. And more photos. But I'll wait patiently.

    Derrell

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    1. Thanks Brother d. Of the four I have, non have the locker. Easy detail to make anyhow, You can bet pictures will follow when the locomotive is completed.

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  4. OK... so I've proven to myself that I'm not going crazy!
    In Robert Grandt's NG Pictorial #4 (C&S Motive Power), on page's 129, 131, 150 & 160, are photos of C&S locomotives with engineers side curtains, circa 1920 (the era in which I model).
    Whew! I thought I was losing it.
    I will need to find an era correct photo of how it may have wrapped around the top of the cab (if it did).
    So, the curtains stay the way I have them.... for now ( -:

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    1. Darel:

      Google "Friends of the Cumbres & Toltec." Once on the page, click on the Dorman tab. Go to the top link, and it will take you to a whole page of PDFs. Friend's volunteers have documented Dick's whole collection and posted it. If you scroll down, there are (4) PDFs relating to the C&S. Click on the first locomotive PDF. The locomotives are sorted in numerical order. Scroll to photos of number 8 (I think). There is a clear shot of the engineers side from the rear with the engineers curtain set back. Looking at the second PDF, there are a number of images showing cab curtains on the 2-8-0s, but none close up on the engineers side.

      The C&S spotted locomotives pilot first in the roundhouse, and Otto Perry evidently liked to stop by the 9th Street Roundhouse after work. Fortunately the narrow gauge stalls were on the west, and so all the photos are of the fireman's side. Boo hoo.

      Happy hunting!

      Busy Saturday morning?

      Keith Hayes
      Leadville in Sn3

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    2. OK. I have found what I was looking for. Page 114 in Grandt's Pictorial #6;Number 55 in 1925.

      I will consider this general practice for the era I am modeling, and will be moving the rear curtain to the back of the roofline, but keeping the engineers side curtain.

      Thanks to all who helped with suggestions and information!

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  5. Thanks for the tip Keith! I will check that out.
    I think I am available Saturday morning. What have you in mind? Operating session?

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  6. Yup. 10am?

    Also, don't forget Tom Klinger's books. Lots of good pics during snow bucking west of Dickey. I checked out Grandt's book and you appear to be correct in locating the curtains as you did--as with all C&S modifications (and Dr. Poole's research), locomotives tended to vary over time with wrecks.

    I will have to drink some tea myself.

    Keith Hayes
    Leadville in Sn3

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    1. 10am works for me. Thanks!
      I just took a road trip in Casper up to Idaho Springs and #60. I will post pictures later. Turns out everyone is correct. And I mean everyone (-:

      Tea is good for you.

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    2. Darel,
      the definitive photo you want is of C&S 70 derailed at Maddox in 1923. The righted loco minus tender clearly shows the outboard enginedriver's curtain intact, amazing considered how wrecked those cabs could get, the outboard fireman's curtain intact, the central back wall locker with one door ajar intact, no damage to the cab roofline and no uppper back curtain present.
      This photo is in Tom Klingers Platte Canon Memories book pg 163 and pg 126 Trowbridge ed. of Pict. Supt. to D.S.P.&P.
      This style of curtain is confirmed by a picture of #54 in 1900 with a flatcar ahead in Platte Canon at the time of the flood. It shows clearly inward of the cab rear and no upper curtain showing. This photo is on pg 158 Trowbridge Pict. Supt. and printed more clearly on pg 297 of Mal Ferrell's South Park line.
      A side on cab area shot of the #65 with Fireman in the gangway clearly shows the Enginedrivers long curtain hung outside the doorway but no upper curtain as on the later final year arrangement. This photo appears in Tom Klinger's Gunnison Division Memories book on pg54.
      Finally there is one really great shot by Richard Kindig taken at Denver Roundhouse after abandonment of 4 locomotives with the cab curtains in various positions, not all tied back according to regulations. This photo appears on pg 323 of Platte Canon Memories.
      Good luck with your modelling!

      Chris
      in New Zealand

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    3. Once again, all great photos. Thanks for pointing them out Chris. Good luck with yours as well!

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  7. Darel, see you Saturday.

    Chris--thanks for the great posts. This string has been prolific in new information. I especially enjoyed the image of the 8 with the Denver passenger and the multiple coal scoops lodged under the handrail. A great detail to model (along with the wood coal grate). I also note the water bag on the tender: this fireman is ready for a long trip! Also of note is the Clear Creek double header with both engineers facing rear as they are running tender first back to Denver. Since you like to search the DPL archives, care to look for Leadville images? There are not many.

    Keith Hayes
    Leadville in Sn3

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    1. Keith - Did you get my email yesterday?

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  8. Darel,
    looks like the best of the best this time. Check out this great shot of C&S Bobber 1008 at Alma. Also check out the 69 in the background as well :)
    http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/p15330coll22/id/43649/rv/singleitem/rec/380
    or Otto Perry OP-6377 at the DPL.

    Chris
    in New Zealand

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