Saturday, September 20, 2014

Roper's Snapshot Saturday No.15 | 15 Comments - Click Here :








15 Comments - Click Here :
  1. Do you have any idea where the boxcar shed near the Arvada depot came from?Could that be a Hallack Bros. car? Do you notice the battens applied to the car siding?

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    1. I do not know the answer to that Bob. The battens are a neat detail though!

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  2. You are such a smart dogie Roper! Thank you for posting the pictures of your hometown. Just goes to show that there was more than just mountains on the C&S narrow gauge. There were many miles of rural countryside it passed through as well.
    I'm not sure at what date the depot was stuccoed. I'm not aware of any other C&S depots that this was applied to either. The last two pictures were taken the morning it was to be demolished in the early 60's. I have of few more of them but I can't find them right now.
    The Arvada Historical Society has a few more excellent views as well.

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  3. Terrific pictures Darel. Even with all the years gone by, sleepy little Arvada hasn't changed greatly. And a great reminder that the narrow gauge was not just for hauling ore. Not only did Arvada have more car dealerships than any city around but it was the largest growing region for celery in the state of Colorado. Think of all those carloads of Buicks and Celery on the narrow gauge!

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  4. One of your earlier posts shows a similar car on the ground at Frisco-with battens.There is another picture of it on the Frisco website on your links.A couple of DPL photos labled "Tenmile Pass" show a DSP&P MOW car snowed in that is definitely an old Hallack car.It appears that the car is sheathed with plain pannelling-almost like plywood.I think that there was an article in RMC or somewhere describing some more modern ET&WNC boxcars that were sheathed with plywood.Could the battens be an effort to get a little extra mileage out of some old sheathing?

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  5. This is a great series of photos, Darel. I think you hit the nail on the head in pointing out the C&Sng wasn’t all deep gorgie canyons and lofty precipitous cliffhangers. There was the grit of the city and the relatively flat rural as well. By the early 20th century the C&S was pretty much the only common carrier narrow gauge road in and around Denver and much of it three rail. There is a photo of C&S 64 at what I think might be either Jersey Junction or even near the 40th Street UP shops. It sits on 3 rail track and is equipped with 3 way couplers - obviously a switch engine. This aspect of the railroad is fascinating. Modeling it would be a challenge but with great reward.

    The ICC field notes are a neat suppliment. Where did you get this?

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    1. Is this the one on p375 of the DSP&P Pictorial?With short smokebox,pancake stack,backup light-parked in front of a two story brick "hotel".Why don't some people model the C&S in the1899-1905 era?

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    2. Yes, that's the photo - except that this is a cropping and you can't see what is in the background. The 2 story building has never struck me as a hotel. It seems more industrial in nature and the location seems odd for a hotel - in the middle of a railway complex? Maybe I'm wrong...

      Yes. Why don't some people model the 1899 - 1905 period of the RR? I know some do. The Kiplinger brothers, Doug Heitkamp, and a few others. I think the reasons are for the same reasons people model the later periods - it is a lot of work to back date engine models and scratch build much of your rolling stock. One of the major issues in S scale are the detail parts like the heavy wooden pilots the C&S used and the other things like McConnell stacks, proper domes and headlamps and smokebox fronts. It's a lot easier to go buy a PBL K-27 and a bunch of RTR 3000 series box cars. But I'm sure you could do it.

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  6. I offer my slant on the converted boxcar for freighthouse. Perhaps the sheathing of Board and Batten was to upstyle the otherwise plain de-trucked Boxcar in the light of the proximity to "Main Street" and the eyes of the town fathers?

    Nice area, "rural" Denver not as I knew it. Met some nice guys there too! {:))

    UpSideDown C
    Chris
    in New Zealand

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  7. Thanks guys. I agree with Chris that the siding was probably for aesthetic reasons. Perhaps someday you'll be back to our humble sleepy town Chris. 2017?
    I'd like to see that photo of the 64 Derrell. I don't recall where I got the field notes from. Maybe it was Brother Rick?
    Don - I have one of the books put out by the Arvada Historical Society, that has an aerial photo taken from atop the water tower which shows a large fenced in area on the corner of Wadsworth and Grandview. I can't tell what it's filled with, but may be produce of some sort. I'm positive it isn't Buicks. Lol.

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    1. Denver 2017 eh? Now why did you go and put that idea into my head.....I'm supposed to be done travelling.

      UpSideDownC
      Chris
      in New Zealand

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  8. Ok, I'll add my two cents on the boxcar covering - tar paper with battens. This was a pretty common practice back then. Once the car became too tired for service and found new life as a shed or such, why would the RR spend the extra money to put wood on the sides? Certainly not just to look better. Tar paper was much cheaper and would do a good job of keeping out the weather. remember, the RR was cheap and would cut corners all the time to save a buck. Remember the DSP&P boxcar brought down from Cardinal that is now in Como? It was covered in tar paper with roofing shingles over that.

    Doug

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    1. Hey Doug !!
      I did base that board and batten on the ICC listing above...{:))
      from what I could deciepher...
      "...Roof cov, comp. 100fs (OR 10 of ?) - walls (either) dd (OR) cld (clad?) 1x6 T&G..."
      "...2 doors 3-6x6-0 1x4 TvG (OR T&G?)..."
      "...1 runway 3x5' of 2" ..."
      "...Walls cov.1'B+B..."

      The mans handwriting with those excessive drops flowing into the line below are confusing somewhat as is the use of graph paper.

      regards to you,

      UpSideDown C
      in NZ

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  9. I remember when my daughter was in elementary school in Arvada we went on a walking tour of downtown and they talked about a particular species of celery called Pascal that Arvada was known for. May have to cut and past the link http://www.egardenseed.com/Pascal_Celery_Seeds_p/0126.1.htm Apparently famous throughout the land. Also her teachers Grandfather owned one of the early car dealerships in old town Arvada. She commented that the cars were shipped in by rail. And lets not forget the "Arva-pride" flour mill still standing on the tracks. I imagine many bags of flour were shipped west up Clear Creek.

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  10. Do you have any ideas as to where the pictures came from? I'm with the Arvada Historical Society and some of these photos I haven't seen and would like to have copies to add to our archival holdings. If you have any ideas or don't mind us taking the photos from your website, please contact me at mprythero@arvadahistory.org - Thanks!

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